Article: Character and Kids in a Digital Media World

Article: Character and Kids in a Digital Media World

 

digital_character

Build Character Strengths with Quality Media

How to support kids’ character and life-skills development through media — and parenting. By Caroline Knorr

How to support kids’ character and life-skills development through media — and parenting.

Every parent wants to raise kids with strong character. Grateful, humble, compassionate, brave: We know these strengths lead to improved well-being, better relationships, and sound communities.

Still, figuring out which characteristics to teach, how to reinforce them, and even whose job it is to do it (parent, teacher, coach?) is a thorny issue. And when kids are spending several hours a day glued to a screen — possibly on a personal device with earbuds in — it can be difficult to find opportunities to reinforce character lessons. Here’s the good news: Media — from video games to TV shows to movies — can help teach character. But it doesn’t just happen. Parents have to make it happen by choosing quality media, focusing on character-building ideas, and talking about the messages.

You’re probably already doing some of this, by watching TV with your kid and asking why a character made certain choices; playing a video game and helping your kid learn to take turns and be a good sport; and discussing responsible online behavior.

You’re on the right track. The days of simply restricting kids’ media use for fear that it hinders character growth are over. With kids using media for everything from playtime to learning to creating to communicating, it’s essential that parents use these opportunities to strengthen kids’ social-emotional development.

Why It Matters

In today’s digital world, many parents worry about the loss of character as more kids spend time alone on a computer or communicating through a screen. But research shows that kids can and do learn from media — what matters is which messages they’re absorbing and how those messages get reinforced.

Whether it’s from a preschool show about sharing or a teen video game about war, lessons about character can positively affect kids’ behavior and self-esteem. Most importantly, parents who are involved in their kids’ media lives — parents who co-view, co-play, and talk about TV shows, movies, books, and games — reinforce their own values as well as the media’s pro-social messages.

Character-Trait and Life-Skills Media Advice by Age

As former FCC commissioner Nicholas Johnson put it, “All television is educational television. The question is, what is it teaching?” You can apply this question to all media. By choosing shows, movies, apps, games, and books geared toward your kid’s age and developmental stage, you can better support character lessons.

Tips for Parents of Little Kids
Tips for Parents of Big Kids
Tips for Parents of Tweens and Teens

Character Traits, Life Skills, and Media Picks That Support Them


Tips for Parents of Little Kids
Watch, play, read, and talk. Simply enjoying a show, a book, or a game together and discussing a character’s behavior and actions helps kids better understand the internal motivation behind character traits. At this age, kids will soak up whatever they see and hear, so look for media with positive role models, messages about sharing and being a good friend, and managing feelings. These tips can help:

Books, TV, Movies

  • Keep things simple. Stories with one main idea that’s supported by the action are most effective for preschoolers. Look for short TV shows that stick to pro-social messages. Little kids often think that it’s the threat of punishment that makes a protagonist behave a certain way. Help them understand that it’s important to do the right thing even when, for example, you won’t get caught.
  • Don’t expect young kids to understand the moral of the story. Folktales and fables are fun, but their messages don’t necessarily get through to preschoolers (especially when the characters aren’t human). No need to push it if the moral is lost on your kid.
  • Look for characters and situations your kid can relate to. Kids who see themselves in a protagonist are more likely to understand and copy their pro-social behavior. A show about the importance of honesty, for example, will go over better if your kid has something in common with the character — say, a new baby sister or a dislike of broccoli.

Interactive, Digital Media

  • Model digital citizenship. Put your phone away when you’re not using it — and explain that you don’t want your phone to get in the way of your time with your kids. When you go online, explain to your kids exactly what you’re doing. Tell them that you’re respectful of people you’re talking to and texting with. (Get more screen-time tips.)
  • Set limits around screen time. Establish rules about when kids can play with your phone to help develop self-control.

Tips for Parents of Big Kids
Help kids translate positive media messages to their own behavior. Co-viewing, co-playing, and modeling good digital citizenship continue to be important. Once kids can read, write, and go online independently, character lessons can extend to how you expect your kids to act in the online world. These tips can help:

Books, Movies, TV

  • Simple is still better. This age group still has some difficulty understanding character lessons in complex stories. They need to see the basic cause-and-effect sequence of how a character’s motives are connected to actions and consequences.
  • Fables can wait. Children are typically unable to extract lessons from fables until fourth grade. Younger children tend to retell specific parts of the story instead of absorbing a more general principle. Enjoy them if you want to — just don’t expect kids to learn the morality message.

Interactive, Digital Media

  • Teach digital citizenship. Explain your rules about responsible online behavior.
  • Choose cooperative games. Find games that depend on players working together to solve a problem.
  • Failing is OK. Look for apps that reward you for trying and trying again.
  • Think outside the box. Introduce games and apps that emphasize creativity and curiosity vs. those that are simply goal-oriented.

Tips for Parents of Tweens and Teens
At this age, kids can make clearer distinctions between right and wrong. As digital savvy increases, tweens and teens appreciate what they have — and the responsibility that they have to make the digital world a positive environment. These tips can help:

Books, Movies, TV

  • Seek out complexity. Tweens are emotionally and mentally mature enough to understand others’ perspectives and to engage in abstract reasoning. At this age, you can discuss how a character acts when he’s conflicted.
  • Stay involved. The ability to summarize the gist or main theme of a story develops late, often not until age 14. Tweens and teens still need parents to guide them through the intended moral takeaway.
  • Don’t be obvious. Tweens and teens often reject moralistic messages to protect their sense of freedom and/or reassert their independence. Offer titles in which there’s a moral dilemma and no clear-cut choice. When older kids interpret books, movies, or shows as agenda-less, absorbing, and relevant, they are most likely to really get the moral lessons they model. Instead of pointing out the lesson, ask them what they think and engage them in critical thinking.

Interactive, Digital Media

  • Discuss online ethics. Talk about the importance of staying true to yourself even in seemingly consequence-free situations. It’s easy to cheat or copy work, for example, but that damages your integrity.
  • Teach kids to be upstanders. Help them develop compassion and empathy by talking about the importance of standing up for people who are victimized online or in person.
  • Talk about anonymity. At this age, kids may not yet understand how their seemingly anonymous behavior can have a real effect on real people. Help them develop a sense of empathy with their online relationships.
  • Stress respectful communication. Kindness is only part of it. Explain how to comment constructively and contribute productively on social media.
  • Help them protect their and others’ privacy. Discuss what should remain private and what’s OK to put out there.
  • Put “likes” in perspective. It’s not necessarily a bad thing when kids compete for followers on Instagram or other social media. But help tweens and teens realize that their self-worth isn’t determined by how many likes they get — and that a little humility is a positive virtue.
  • Remind them of the value of their devices. However it works for you — whether it’s having your kid contribute money or chores or making them pay outright for downloads — it’s important for kids to develop gratitude by understanding that these things are a privilege.
  • Encourage your kid’s school to teach digital literacy. So much of what happens at school is mirrored in the online world. It benefits the entire community when kids learn to be responsible digital citizens.

Character Traits, Life Skills, and Media Picks That Support Them

Common Sense Media worked with researchers and educators to identify and define 11 key characteristics that embody life skills, moral choices, and personal virtues. We then mapped each trait to movies and TV shows so you can easily find shows and use our reviews to start conversations.

Communication
Listening attentively and appreciatively, expressing yourself clearly and sensitively, and honoring differences.
Movies That Promote Communication
TV That Promotes Communication

Compassion
Caring about others and behaving toward others with affection, generosity, and concern.
Movies That Inspire Compassion
TV That Inspires Compassion

Courage
Taking on challenges even when there’s risk. Speaking up for what’s right even if there’s opposition; acting on your convictions.
Movies That Inspire Courage
TV That Inspires Courage

Curiosity
Having a strong desire to learn or know something — a search for information for its own sake. Actively seeking out challenges and new experiences.
Movies That Inspire Curiosity
TV That Inspires Curiosity

Empathy
Understanding the feelings and perspective of another person; putting yourself “in their shoes.”
Movies That Inspire Empathy
TV That Inspires Empathy

Gratitude
Being aware of and thankful for the good things that happen in your life and taking the time to express appreciation and return kindness.
Movies That Inspire Gratitude
TV That Inspires Gratitude

Humility
Not regarding yourself as more special or better than others.
Movies That Promote Humility
TV That Promotes Humility

Integrity
Speaking the truth. Acting in a sincere way. Treating people equally and taking responsibility for your feelings and actions.
Movies That Inspire Integrity
TV That Inspires Integrity

Perseverance
Persisting in a course of action in spite of obstacles. Steadfastness in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success.
Movies That Promote Perseverance
TV That Promotes Perseverance

Self-Control
Being able to appropriately manage your thoughts, feelings, and impulses. Requires paying attention to your emotions and feelings.
Movies That Promote Self-Control
TV That Promotes Self-Control

Teamwork
Working respectfully and effectively with a group and doing your share.
Movies That Promote Teamwork
TV That Promotes Teamwork

About the Author: Caroline Knorr

As Common Sense Media’s parenting editor, Caroline helps parents make sense of what’s going on in their kids’ media lives. From games to cell phones to movies and more, if you’re wondering “what’s the right age for…?” Caroline can help you make the decision that works best for your family. She has more than 20 years of editorial and creative marketing writing experience and has held senior-level positions at Walmart.com, Walmart stores, Cnet, and Bay Area Parent magazine. She specializes in translating complex information into bite-sized chunks to help families make informed choices about what their kids watch, play, read, and do. And she’s the proud mom of a teenage son whose media passions include Star Wars, StarCraft,graphic novels, and the radio program This American Life.

 

Common Sense Media is an independent nonprofit organization offering unbiased ratings and trusted advice to help families make smart media and technology choices. Check out our ratings and recommendations at www.commonsensemedia.org.

Alison, the American iMum is from Massachusetts. She lives there with her sons and husband. In their spare time, they enjoy playing outside, enjoying nature and of course testing apps and fantastic products on their devices. They have a variety of devices including an iPad, iPhone, and an iPod and is often found with a device! My older son loves technology and loves testing out the “latest and newest” apps and tech. I love sharing information about apps and products with others to help them make decisions without feeling overwhelmed with all of the choices.
Article: Screen Time and Kids – Achieving a balance

Article: Screen Time and Kids – Achieving a balance

screen-time

You balance their meals, so why not their media? Learn the secrets to a well-balanced media diet. By Caroline Knorr
Many parents struggle with exactly how much screen time is OK for their kids. Is a half-hour show OK but a full-length movie “bad”? How much gaming should you allow when your kid also uses his computer for homework? Does Wikipedia count as “reading”? And when does a passion for say, video games, become problematic? The truth is, there is no magic formula. And just as every family differs in what they eat, when they eat, and what they like, a healthy media diet is different for every family. The key is making sure that the things that are important to your family are fairly balanced over the long term.

A healthy media diet balances activities (games, social media, TV), time (15 minutes? Three hours?), and choices (YouTube, Minecraft, Star Wars) with offline activities (sports, face-to-face conversations, daydreaming). At some point, kids will be able to manage their own media diets. In the meantime, these tips can help set them up for success.

Find balance. Instead of counting daily screen-time minutes, aim for a balance throughout the week. Get your kids to help plan a week that includes stuff they have to do and stuff they like to do, such as schoolwork, activities, chores, reading, family time, and TV or gaming. Decide on limits and behavior using our Family Media Agreement.

Walk the walk. Put your devices away while driving, at mealtimes, and during important conversations. Kids will learn habits from you.

Talk about it. Ask questions about kids’ favorite games, shows, and characters. Discuss ideas and issues they read about or learn about through a TV show or a game. This is an opportunity for bonding, learning, and sharing your values.

Create tech-free zones.Set rules that fit your family, such as “no devices during dinner,” “no social media during homework,” or “all screens off before bedtime.”

Check ratings. Choose age-appropriate, high-quality media and tech for your kids. Use our reviews to find good stuff.

 

About the Author: Caroline Knorr

As Common Sense Media’s parenting editor, Caroline helps parents make sense of what’s going on in their kids’ media lives. From games to cell phones to movies and more, if you’re wondering “what’s the right age for…?” Caroline can help you make the decision that works best for your family. She has more than 20 years of editorial and creative marketing writing experience and has held senior-level positions at Walmart.com, Walmart stores, Cnet, and Bay Area Parent magazine. She specializes in translating complex information into bite-sized chunks to help families make informed choices about what their kids watch, play, read, and do. And she’s the proud mom of a teenage son whose media passions include Star Wars, StarCraft,graphic novels, and the radio program This American Life.

 

Common Sense Media is an independent nonprofit organization offering unbiased ratings and trusted advice to help families make smart media and technology choices. Check out our ratings and recommendations at www.commonsensemedia.org.

 Jump! A Game of Numbers by Artgig Studio – Review

Jump! A Game of Numbers by Artgig Studio – Review



iPad Screenshot 2

What we love…

the problems get harder or easier dynamically for kids so if they struggle on one level it goes back to retest the skill again

What we’d love to see…

ability to sync across devices and a dashboard highlighting areas your child may be having trouble with

Summary

Fun interactive math app perfect for elementary school and up – even as a mom I found myself trying to save the Snortles!

Our Rating

Jump! A Game of Numbers iconJump! A Game of Numbers by Artgig Apps is a universal app for iOS that features math including addition, subtraction and of course fun with Snortles.  This app allows you to practice simple number identification, addition, subtraction, putting numbers together, planning to capture the Snortles and more!

This is a fun yet addicting math game that encourages kids to practice their math skills in a fun yet interactive way.  One of my favorite parts is that it gets harder and easier depending on how your child does with the level.  By dynamically adjusting it makes the app fun and encourages kids to stay engaged.  This app is a great way to practice #commoncore math skills by problem solving in different ways – it adapts to the child or user so you will be challenged, but the challenge isn’t so hard that you will give up.  My son also liked that you could make the path in any direction that you wanted rather than having to follow a liner path – especially when he went to find the Snortles.  I turned off the stompers and fuses for him on the front page so it became for fun and less stressful – sometimes they would be stresful for him, so it wasn’t worth it!  I also liked that you could have unlimited accounts which meant that even I could play!  I liked that I could have my own account and that way my son could do things on his level and didn’t find it too hard when he played!  The illustrations are beautiful as are the graphics.  By having dynamic math problems, kids and adults are engaged and want to play more!   I also liked that it was not your traditional flashcard drill – by using dynamic screens and games kids can’t “game the system” and memorize the questions to get to the end of a level.  My son enjoyed the beach ball party when he successfully completed one of the environments.  There are six different chances to have a party!

iPad Screenshot 5

Skills practiced include:

– mental math
– skip counting
– basic addition
– different ways to solve a problem (putting numbers together)
– flexibility
– creative thinking on how to save the Snortles
– “Squishing” of numbers to get to the right one on your path
– dynamic game play so you don’t play the same level over and over again even if you don’t earn enough stars

In terms of enhancements, I’d love to see the ability to sync across devices because there are times I have my iPhone but not my iPad and vice versa.  I’d also like to see a parent screen where I could see specific areas that challenged my son – perhaps he’s getting stuck with a specific skill or number in a sequence so I could help him advance.

 

Another five star winner from Artgig.  They seem to have the “secret sauce” when it comes to creating fun interactive apps that are dynamic and kids want to play over and over again!  Great job Artgig!  There are no in-app purchases or external advertisements contained within the app.


Jump Numbers
Jump Numbers
by Artgig Studio

Category: Education, Games, Educational, Strategy
Requirements: Compatible with iPad2Wifi-iPad2Wifi, iPad23G-iPad23G, iPhone4S-iPhone4S, iPadThirdGen-iPadThirdGen, iPadThirdGen4G-iPadThirdGen4G, iPhone5-iPhone5, iPodTouchFifthGen-iPodTouchFifthGen, iPadFourthGen-iPadFourthGen, iPadFourthGen4G-iPadFourthGen4G, iPadMini-iPadMini, iPadMini4G-iPadMini4G, iPhone5c-iPhone5c, iPhone5s-iPhone5s, iPadAir-iPadAir, iPadAirCellular-iPadAirCellular, iPadMiniRetina-iPadMiniRetina, iPadMiniRetinaCellular-iPadMiniRetinaCellular, iPhone6-iPhone6, iPhone6Plus-iPhone6Plus, iPadAir2-iPadAir2, iPadAir2Cellular-iPadAir2Cellular, iPadMini3-iPadMini3, iPadMini3Cellular-iPadMini3Cellular, iPodTouchSixthGen-iPodTouchSixthGen, iPhone6s-iPhone6s, iPhone6sPlus-iPhone6sPlus, iPadMini4-iPadMini4, iPadMini4Cellular-iPadMini4Cellular, iPadPro-iPadPro, iPadProCellular-iPadProCellular, iPadPro97-iPadPro97, iPadPro97Cellular-iPadPro97Cellular, iPhoneSE-iPhoneSE, iPhone7-iPhone7, iPhone7Plus-iPhone7Plus, iPad611-iPad611, iPad612-iPad612, iPad71-iPad71, iPad72-iPad72, iPad73-iPad73, iPad74-iPad74
Size: 186.97 MB

$2.99USD

Screenshots
(Click to enlarge)
Screenshots for iPad
(Click to enlarge)

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Alison, the American iMum is from Massachusetts. She lives there with her sons and husband. In their spare time, they enjoy playing outside, enjoying nature and of course testing apps and fantastic products on their devices. They have a variety of devices including an iPad, iPhone, and an iPod and is often found with a device! My older son loves technology and loves testing out the “latest and newest” apps and tech. I love sharing information about apps and products with others to help them make decisions without feeling overwhelmed with all of the choices.
 Avaz Pro – AAC App for Autism by Avaz, Inc. – Review & Giveaway

Avaz Pro – AAC App for Autism by Avaz, Inc. – Review & Giveaway



Note – this review was published in 2015 and this is simply a republishing with a new giveaway
quick

What we love…

Intuitive, easy to navigate interface

Purposeful tutorial with practice mode and strategy tips

Cutting-edge predictive text

Ease of editing and adding content

Amazing wealth of resources to support the caregiver

What we’d love to see…

Perhaps they could expand the communication adventures tutorial to meet the needs of older, nonverbal students.

Otherwise, I am hard-pressed to recommend any improvements at this time. They’ve truly thought of everything.

Summary

AVAZ Pro has set the standard for what an AAC app should be.  From the indispensable tutorials and caregiver support, to the predictive text and analytics, AVAZ Pro is one of the most intuitive and innovative AAC apps I’ve seen to date.  I highly recommend this exceptional app to support the communication of those without a voice.

Our Rating

Avaz Pro - AAC App for Autism (Augmentative Picture Communication Software for Children with Special Needs)AVAZ Pro is an outstanding AAC app designed for children on the Autism spectrum and those with complex communication needs.  The app was developed in collaboration with 25 schools and 500 children to help those with autism achieve the most effective communication possible.

As with most AAC apps, there are highly customizable settings for editing page lay-out, vocabulary, icons, and folders.  The home page is your starting point.  You can select from 1 to 40 pictures to be shown on the screen per page depending on the child’s communication level or visual limitations.  There are 3 pre-set levels (1: 15 pics, 2: 24 pics, 3: 40 pics) to help customize the board to your child’s needs.  Symbolstix icons (similar to Board Maker) are used to illustrate the concept of each button.  The buttons are color coded by parts of speech (i.e. verbs are green).

The home page gives access to several commonly used words (yes/no, I, you, want) and folders which are organized by category (i.e. people, food, things, places, actions).  One folder has “quick” pre-set phrases while another has a set of topics including the child’s interests and hobbies. Access to a set of core words can be found on the menu to the right of the main button layout.  As always, these folders and buttons can be easily edited according to the child’s needs and interests. Under settings, you can adjust the format of the screen (number of buttons per page from 1-40), what is spoken (each word selected vs only the message box), size of pictures/text, zoom preferences, color coding, and prediction settings.

The format is user-friendly and intuitive.  There are over 15,000 vocabulary words with accompanying Symbolstix pictures. The app is one of the easiest to edit and customize that I have seen.  It has a Settings Wizard allowing you to enter personal information about the child which then configures the buttons to those preferences (name/age, current communication level, audio-vis or motor needs).  The ability to easily add and edit buttons is another big plus.  You can easily add photos of people and items in the child’s environment as well as search the web directly from the app for additional pictures.

When a button is selected, it zooms in and speaks the word and then shows up in the message box.  You can string together several words for more complex utterances.  When the message is complete, the entire utterance can be spoken aloud by tapping on the message box.  If a mistake is made, you can easily delete a single word at a time by tapping the delete button or erase the entire message box by double clicking it.

There are several voices to choose from and the rate of speech can be adjusted as well.  In addition, there are over 30 different accents/dialects to choose from including Spanish, French, Chinese, and Italian which speak the English words in those accents.

The search function is very valuable when wanting to explore vocabulary options or find a specific word.  You can also easily switch from picture buttons to keyboard by pressing the button to the left of the message box.  The predictive function on the keyboard is unparalleled.  Several word choices are presented as each letter is typed anticipating the word.  I love how it provides several different verb forms to help promote grammatically correct utterances.  For example, if I manually type in “eat”, the following verb forms are presented as options: eat, eating, eaten eats.

One of the most challenging obstacles of introducing a new AAC device to a child is becoming oriented with the location of all the buttons and teaching them how to use the device to communicate effectively.  It is often difficult enough for the Speech Pathologist to become familiar with and edit an AAC device, not to mention the caregivers and child who may have no previous experience with this format. This app makes this task a little less daunting.

quick

One of the features that truly sets this app apart from other AAC apps is the Dashboard.  This feature provides strategies to help integrate the use of AAC into the child’s daily activities.  Under this tab, you will find activities to help practice conversations and learn strategies to help expand and develop your child’s communication abilities.  There are 10 scenarios provided in which to practice guided conversations which help you become acclimated to the location of word buttons.  For example, in the “Conversation about pain” section, you can practice formulating such statements as “My head hurts”, “I want water please”, and “Do you want help?”  The app takes you step-by-step through the path needed to select all the appropriate words.  Visual cues such as an arrow or wiggling button give prompts as needed.  You can even view a pull-down menu of the entire path needed to complete the utterance.  This practice mode is an ingenious and essential tool for orientation to the location of buttons in order to increase the ease and efficiency of communication.

In addition to practicing specific sentences, there is a tutorial for using strategies to help expand your child’s communication abilities via conversation practice.  It provides a scenario and then prompts the caregiver to choose the best statement from 2-3 choices to help move the conversation forward without overwhelming the child.  It prompts the communication partner to ask specific yes/no questions to eliminate options, use self-talk, and expand on the child’s utterances.  This tutorial guides caregivers through the appropriate conversation skills they should be using with their child to maximize the effectiveness of the AAC app.

You can even customize specific phrases you would like to practice and model under the “My sentences” tab.  If you wanted to practice the sentence “I want to go to Grandma’s house”, the tutorial simplifies the sentence to “I want go Grandma’s house” and then walks you through the steps, prompting as necessary, to locate each folder and button to complete the phrase.

There is an Analytics tab which keeps track of the child’s vocabulary development and word use.  You can view the most frequently used words as compared to the all words used. It also gives an estimate of the average length of sentences spoken (MLU) over a period of time which you can set the dates for.  This is an excellent resource for keeping track of your child’s communication development over time.

A wealth of information can be found under the Resources tab, where there are well over 120 tips provided to help increase the effectiveness of using the AAC device.  There are also internet links to web pages and research articles supporting the use of AAC.  An intro video to the app can be found under the help tab in this section.

Another unique feature is the ability to print vocabulary pages to be used as a book.  This would allow the option to laminate pages for use near water (bath, pool) without the threat of damaging the device. With a little pre-planning, there is no need to let any situation which may prohibit the use of electronic devices limit the child’s ability to communicate.

The most recent update to the app introduced the ability to access a teletherapy call with Avaz Live. The developers are clearly determined to make improvements for an even better experience using their app.  The amount of user support located on their website and within the app itself is impressive as well.  Besides videos explaining specific features, there are slide tutorials guiding you through picture vs keyboard mode, customization, and the settings.

path

This app truly grows with your child as there are 3 grades of core-words based vocabulary presented in a predictable and intuitive format.  The vocab is structured to promote increasingly complex exchanges beyond just requesting items.  While the caregiver tutorial fosters a scaffolding approach to expanding a child’s utterance.  The app also stimulates literacy development by using both symbols and words.  When the child is ready, he can transition over to using the keyboard for input all while keeping the picture option easily accessible.

AVAZ Pro has set the standard for what an AAC app should be.  From the indispensable tutorials and caregiver support, to the predictive text and analytics, AVAZ Pro is one of the most intuitive and innovative AAC apps I’ve seen to date.  I highly recommend this exceptional app to support the communication of those without a voice.


Avaz Pro - AAC App for Autism
Avaz Pro - AAC App for Autism
by Avaz, Inc.

Category: Education, Medical
Requirements: Compatible with iPad2Wifi-iPad2Wifi, iPad23G-iPad23G, iPadThirdGen-iPadThirdGen, iPadThirdGen4G-iPadThirdGen4G, iPadFourthGen-iPadFourthGen, iPadFourthGen4G-iPadFourthGen4G, iPadMini-iPadMini, iPadMini4G-iPadMini4G, iPadAir-iPadAir, iPadAirCellular-iPadAirCellular, iPadMiniRetina-iPadMiniRetina, iPadMiniRetinaCellular-iPadMiniRetinaCellular, iPadAir2-iPadAir2, iPadAir2Cellular-iPadAir2Cellular, iPadMini3-iPadMini3, iPadMini3Cellular-iPadMini3Cellular, iPadMini4-iPadMini4, iPadMini4Cellular-iPadMini4Cellular, iPadPro-iPadPro, iPadProCellular-iPadProCellular, iPadPro97-iPadPro97, iPadPro97Cellular-iPadPro97Cellular, iPad611-iPad611, iPad612-iPad612, iPad71-iPad71, iPad72-iPad72, iPad73-iPad73, iPad74-iPad74
Size: 1068.1 MB

$199.99USD

Screenshots for iPad
(Click to enlarge)

Giveaway

If you would like to win a promo code for this app, please enter via the widget below. Winners will be emailed and must contact The iMums within 48 hours to claim their prize. This giveaway is open to everyone, worldwide, and an iTunes account is required to claim the prize. Please ensure you have read and understand our Terms & Conditions. Good luck!

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Shari is a married mother of four from Illinois. She works as a speech pathologist in a rehab setting and loves to use apps in therapy. She is a self-proclaimed “Appaholic”- always on the look out for great apps!

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